Recent Updates

  1. Management Considerations for the Cribbing Horse

    Aug 3, 2020

    Note: This article was originally peer reviewed and published through SDSU Extension (iGrow) in 2015. It was updated for an Ohio audience in 2020.
  2. Double-Cropping Soybean Following Small Grains

    Jul 29, 2020

    Double cropping is the establishment and harvest of a second crop (usually soybean) the same season that a first crop is harvested (usually a small grain). There are two primary requirements for profitable double cropping: 
  3. Starting a 4-H Teen Leader Group 

    Jul 28, 2020

    The following information is a guide for starting, expanding, or maintaining a teen leader group. Individuals who start a group or would like more assistance, should reach out to the Ohio 4-H teen leadership design team to be involved in the mentorship program. 
  4. Using the Depletion Deduction to Minimize Oil and Gas Tax Liability

    Dec 3, 2012

    Landowners who have active oil and gas extraction on their property may be able to reduce their income tax liability for their royalty payments by using what the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) refers to as the "depletion deduction."
  5. Shale Oil and Gas Payments Are Subject to Ohio Commercial Activity Tax

    Dec 3, 2012

    Landowners across Ohio may be surprised to learn that lease bonus and royalty dollars received for shale oil and gas leases are subject to the Ohio Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) if the payments total over $150,000 annually. The CAT is an annual tax imposed on the privilege of doing business in Ohio, measured by taxable gross receipts from most business activities. The CAT was enacted in House Bill 66, passed by the 126th General Assembly in 2005.
  6. Income Tax Management of Oil and Gas Lease Payments

    Dec 3, 2012

    Renewed interest in oil and gas leasing in Ohio has the potential to provide landowners with substantial revenue. Landowners who receive income from oil and gas lease bonus payments and royalty payments must understand the tax implications. Oil and gas income is subject to both federal and state income tax and must be reported appropriately. While a landowner can't avoid paying taxes on oil and gas revenues, the landowner can use strategies to manage income taxes.
  7. Important Aspects of an Oil and Gas Lease

    Jul 20, 2020

    Oil and gas exploration may have great economic implications for landowners; however, money is not the only issue at stake when preparing a lease. A good lease is about maximizing economic gains and protecting the land resource and usability. The terms of a lease should be favorable to both parties. Each landowner has a different set of goals, and those goals influence the desired lease terms. A lease is negotiable, and landowners should work with a knowledgeable attorney to amend an oil and gas lease to meet their desired goals.
  8. Post Corn, Going to Soybean: Use Cereal Rye

    Jul 20, 2020

    This publication is intended to provide a starting point for farmers who are new to growing cover crops. With experience, farmers may fine-tune the use of cover crops for their systems. The following recipe provides an introductory approach to integrating a cover crop into a corn-soybean rotation. Planting a cover crop ahead of a soybean cash crop is often the easiest way to introduce cover crops into the rotation.
  9. Post Soybean, Going to Corn: Use Oats/Radish  

    Jul 16, 2020

    This publication is intended to provide a starting point for farmers who are new to growing cover crops. With experience, farmers can fine-tune the use of cover crops for their systems. The following recipe provides an introductory approach to integrating a cover crop into a soybean-corn rotation. Often the easiest place to begin is to plant a cover crop ahead of a soybean cash crop following corn, so consider starting with the companion recipe titled Post Corn, Going to Soybean (publication MCCC-116; see Resources).   
  10. College Savings Options

    Jun 9, 2020

    For many, a college education is something they dream of, and with proper planning, it can become a reality. According to The Federal Reserve (May 2019) the typical amount of education debt in 2018, among those with any outstanding balances, was between $20,000 and $24,999. Ohio residents are slightly above the national average debt ($28,650) at $30,629 at the time of graduation with 62% of students having some form of college loan (The Institute for College Access & Success, 2018).

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