Recent Updates

  1. Making Your Own Convenience Foods

    Often times, preparing a family meal seems too much to take on after a busy day of activities. A way to remove the hurdle to sitting down together and eating with your family can be accomplished by planning and preparing part of those meals ahead of time. Keeping a list of already made, or half-made meals can make you feel in control as you start your day.
  2. How to Hire an Arborist

    An arborist, by definition, is an individual trained in the art and science of planting, caring for, and maintaining individual trees. Arborists are knowledgeable about the needs of trees and are trained and equipped to provide proper tree care. Hiring an arborist is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Proper tree care is an investment that can lead to substantial returns. Well-cared-for trees are attractive and can add considerable value to your property. Poorly maintained trees can be a significant liability.
  3. Should I Continue Farming?

    Given the low prices of many farm commodities and a price outlook that may not be positive in the near term, you may be considering exiting agriculture. Making a decision to sell part or all of your farm is not easy and brings a great deal of emotions. Farmers may worry about being seen as a failure, the impact a sale will have on family and employees, or what they will do with their life after the sale. These are realistic concerns, but it’s important you don’t let emotions drive the decision-making process.
  4. Monitoring and Managing Spotted wing Drosophila in Fruit Crops

    Spotted wing Drosophila (SWD) (Drosophila suzukii) is an invasive vinegar fly that attacks otherwise healthy ripening soft-bodied fruits. SWD is native to southeastern Asia, and most likely arrived in other countries via overseas trade of infested fruit. The first U.S. detection occurred in Hawaii in 1980, and in 2008, it was found in the continental U.S. in California. This pest has since spread rapidly to all states except Nevada and Arizona by 2016. It was detected in Ohio raspberries in 2011, and in a variety of small fruit and grapes in 2012.
  5. Creating Signage for Direct Food and Agricultural Sales

    Signage welcomes customers to a farm or market. It can provide information about your farm products, share product attributes, display prices, and invite customers to buy. Signs can skillfully direct customers around agritourism operations and keep lines moving at the farmers market. Whether it’s a large, colorful banner displaying your farm logo or a small produce sign, good signage communicates your farm’s unique brand and value proposition. 
  6. Performing a Physical Exam on a Chicken

    Disease spreads quickly through flocks, therefore, it is important to be able to tell when an animal is abnormal, physically or behaviorally, which can possibly indicate an illness. By observing the bird’s behavior in the flock, as well as performing a physical exam, one can potentially prevent or limit the spread of disease to other birds and achieve a better outcome.
  7. Soybean Cyst Nematode

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, was first identified in Ohio in 1981 and has now been found on soybean in 72 of the 88 Ohio counties. SCN damages soybeans by feeding on roots, robbing the plants of nutrients, and providing wound sites for root rotting fungi to enter. The severity of symptoms and yield losses are dependent on several factors including: the number of nematodes present in the field at planting, the soybean variety, tillage practices, soil texture, fertility, pH, and environmental conditions during the growing season.
  8. Phytophthora Damping-off and Root Rot of Soybean

    Phytophthora damping-off, root, and stem rot have been the most destructive diseases of soybeans in Ohio for more than 60 years. When rainfall saturates fields soon after planting, high incidence of seedling damping-off can result in yield losses greater than 50 percent in individual fields and require replanting. Statewide yield losses average 11 percent in years with wet springs and 8 percent in years with more normal planting seasons. The disease is most severe in poorly drained soils with high clay content.
  9. Oak Wilt

    Oak wilt is a serious and often deadly vascular disease of oaks. The fungal pathogen, Bretziella fagacearum (formerly Ceratocystis fagacearum), is known to occur in North America, but its origin is currently unknown. The pathogen is distributed throughout the Midwest and Texas. Over the years, and with variable frequency, it has been reported from the majority of the 88 Ohio counties.
  10. How to Identify and Enhance Ohio’s Wild Bees in Your Landscape

    When asked where bees live, a human-constructed hive teeming with honey bees is typically the first thing that comes to mind (Image 1). However, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, is just one of 400+ species of bees found in Ohio! These pollinators exhibit a wide range of nesting strategies. Our wild bees can be grouped as cavity nesters or ground nesters. Ground nesting bees make up a surprising percent of the bee diversity—70 percent of the 20,000 species of bees worldwide! The remaining 30 percent of bees are considered cavity nesters.

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