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Ohio State University Extension

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Recent Updates

  1. Tips for Calibrating Grain Yield Monitors—Maximizing Value of Your Yield Data

    Mar 12, 2024

    Calibrating grain yield monitors at harvest can be confusing and time consuming for a combine operator. However, improperly calibrated yield monitors can generate erroneous data that becomes useless or difficult to interpret. Taking the time to calibrate a yield monitor properly pays off when it comes to using yield map data for post-harvest analyses or supporting crop management decisions based on your yield data. Most importantly, quality yield data is required when using yield maps to quantify field results and address questions around profitability.
  2. Forest Management

    Mar 12, 2024

    What is forest management? If you were to ask a forester to define forest management, he/she would probably tell you something like: "Forest management is the application of appropriate technical forestry principles, practices and business techniques (e.g., accounting, cost/benefit analysis, etc.) to the management of a forest to achieve the owner's objectives." Stated more simply, forest management is providing a forest the proper care so that it remains healthy and vigorous and provides the products and the amenities the landowner desires.
  3. Financial Maturity: A Guide to Increasing Financial Returns From Your Woodland

    Mar 12, 2024

    When a forest is harvested using either the individual tree or group selection method1, trees to be cut or retained are commonly selected based on a number of factors including species, quality, diameter, distance from other trees, health and vigor, non-timber value (e.g., wildlife, aesthetics, etc.), risk of loss or damage (during harvest or during the time interval before the next harvest), and maturity. Maturity may refer to either biological or financial maturity, depending on the landowner's objectives.
  4. Crop Tree Management: A Tool to Help You Achieve Your Woodland Goals

    Mar 11, 2024

    Ohio woodland owners have many different reasons for owning and managing their woodlands. Some desire woodlands that provide habitat for a variety of wildlife. Others want a woodland that supports particular types of recreation such as hiking, hunting, and bird watching. Still others want to harvest timber and non-timber products from their woods for home and farm use or to provide periodic income. Most aspire to maintain or improve the health, vigor, and attractiveness of their forest.
  5. Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants in Ohio Forests: Privet (Ligustrum spp.)

    Mar 11, 2024

    Non-native privets compete aggressively with native plant species, and they degrade wildlife habitat. After privets become well-established, control requires substantial investment of manpower and resources; therefore, early detection and rapid response are the most effective means of keeping this species under control. Early establishment of privets often occurs along roadsides, stream corridors and trails. Subsequently, privets invade adjacent forests and fields.
  6. Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants in Ohio's Forests: Autumn Olive and Russian Olive

    Mar 11, 2024

    Autumn and Russian olive are non-native, upright, deciduous shrubs that commonly reach heights up to 20 feet tall. Both species are widely distributed in the United States, since planting began in the mid-1800s to provide food and cover for wildlife, ornamental use, road bank stabilization, erosion control, strip mine reclamation, and shelterbelts.
  7. Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants in Ohio’s Forests: Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)

    Mar 11, 2024

    Garlic mustard (Aliaria petiolata) is a cool-season biennial herbaceous plant first observed in the United States in the mid 1800s. It was introduced from Europe either accidentally or intentionally as a cooking herb. It is extremely tolerant of shaded conditions and is capable of establishing extensive, dense colonies in woodlands. In such situations, it out-competes and displaces native plants (wildflowers, trees, and shrubs) and the wildlife species that depend on them. 
  8. Timber Sale Contracts

    Mar 11, 2024

    Approximately 84 percent of Ohio's forest land is owned by private, nonindustrial woodland owners. Each year many of these individuals receive significant income from their woodlands by properly marketing timber. In addition, by following management guidelines in selecting those trees to be harvested and those to leave standing, they improve the health and vigor of their forest as well as its quality for other uses.
  9. Measuring Standing Trees

    Mar 11, 2024

    Woodland owners often need to measure the merchantable board-foot content (termed "volume") of certain trees in their woodland. In order to sell timber, for example, an estimate is needed of the quantity to be sold. If trees are to be cut to provide lumber, an estimate of volume is needed to determine what size and how many trees to cut. Using the methods described in this article, a woodland owner can estimate the board-foot volume in one or several trees.
  10. Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants in Ohio Forests: Ailanthus

    Mar 11, 2024

    Ailanthus (Ailanthus altissima), also known as tree-of-heaven, is a moderate sized (60 to 80 feet in height), deciduous tree first introduced into the United States from Asia in the late 1700s for use as an urban landscape tree and in strip mine reclamation in the Eastern United States. In many ways ailanthus is an ideal invasive—it grows rapidly (sprouts can attain a height of 6 to 12 feet the first year and grow 3 feet or more per year), is a prolific seeder, a persistent stump and root sprouter, and an aggressive competitor that thrives in full sunlight.

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