CFAES Give Today
Ohioline

Ohio State University Extension

CFAES

Recent Updates

  1. Vibrio Species: Foodborne Illness and Seafood

    Nov 9, 2011

    Fish and seafood harvested from seawater can be contaminated with Vibrio species bacteria, natural inhabitants of the marine environment. The two species with the greatest national public health concern are Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. Vibrio cholera, along with these two species, are pathogens of public health concern in other areas of the world. Fortunately, the bacteria are destroyed with heat, so thoroughly cooking seafood is effective at controlling these pathogens in food.
  2. Aphids on Trees and Shrubs

    Oct 19, 2011

    Aphids are small (1⁄16–1/8 inch long), soft-bodied insects commonly called plant lice or ant cows. Virtually every plant has at least one aphid species that attacks it. These small insects are masters of reproduction and are often found in great numbers on stems or leaves. Some species even feed on the roots of plants. They range in color from green to brown, red, black or purple. Some species may even have different color forms in the same colony. Most have the soft exoskeleton exposed, but some species produce waxy, cottony strands that cover the body.
  3. Lace Bugs

    Oct 19, 2011

    Lace bugs are common pests of a variety of ornamental trees and shrubs. The adults have highly ornamented wings and a hood-like structure covering the head. The entire surface is covered with veins that look like lace. The most common lace bug pests in Ohio include the sycamore lace bug (Corythucha ciliata), hawthorn lace bug (C. cydoniae), hackberry lace bug (C. celtidis), oak lace bug (C.
  4. Pharaoh Ant

    Oct 19, 2011

    Pharaoh ants have become a serious nuisance pest in hospitals, rest homes, apartment dwellings, hotels, grocery stores, food establishments, and other buildings. They feed on a wide variety of foods including jellies, honey, shortening, peanut butter, corn syrup, fruit juices, baked goods, soft drinks, greases, dead insects, and even shoe polish. Also, these ants gnaw holes in silk, rayon, and rubber goods. In hospitals, foraging ants have been found in surgical wounds, I.V.
  5. Carpet Beetles

    Oct 19, 2011

    Carpet beetles feed on animal and plant substances such as wool, fur, feathers, hair, hides, horns, silk, velvet, felts, and bone as well as seeds, grain, cereals, cake mixes, red pepper, rye meal, and flour. Other substances include powdered milk, dog and cat food, leather, book bindings, dead insects, bird and rodent nests, and even cotton, linen, rayon, and jute, especially when stained with spilled food and animal excreta.
  6. Millipedes

    Oct 19, 2011

    Millipedes normally live outdoors but may become nuisance pests indoors by their presence. At certain times of the year (usually late summer and autumn) due to excessive rainfall or even drought, a few or hundreds or more leave the soil and crawl into houses, basements, first-floor rooms, up foundation walls, into living rooms, up side walls, and drop from the ceilings. Some homeowners as early as late June have reported annoying populations accumulating in swimming pools.
  7. Fungus Beetles

    Oct 19, 2011

    Fungus beetles is a general term covering several different beetles associated with damp, humid conditions where fungi, molds, and mildew occur. When new homes are built, moist uncured lumber and/or freshly plastered or papered walls that become covered with molds attract these beetles. Some occur in sawdust left in wall voids after construction. They often build heavy populations throughout late summer and early fall.
  8. Ground Beetles

    Oct 19, 2011

    Ground beetles are occasionally a nuisance indoors by their presence. Homeowners may confuse these beetles for cockroaches, carpet beetles, woodboring beetles, or some other household structural pest. Others are simply curious about these insects after finding them outdoors under stones, logs, boards, and similar places. Some beetles are attracted to lights and enter the home by crawling through small openings and cracks in windows, doors, foundations, etc. Ground beetles normally live outdoors and do not establish themselves indoors.
  9. Bumble Bees and Solitary Bees & Wasps in Urban Landscapes

    Oct 5, 2011

    In most situations it is best not to eliminate ground-nesting bees and wasps since they are valuable pollinators of agricultural and landscape plants. Many are useful predators that help control harmful pests. Though the social bumble bees will defend their nests, most of these bees and wasps are solitary insects that will only sting if you try to capture them or restrain them! Nests or burrows located in areas frequented by humans may require controls in order to prevent human contact and the chance of being stung.
  10. Bagworm and Its Control

    Oct 5, 2011

    The common bagworm, Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis (Haworth), is an interesting caterpillar. The most commonly observed form of this pest is the spindle-shaped silk bag camouflaged with bits of foliage, bark, and other debris. Completed bags range from 1½ to 2½ inches long. The larva within the bag is brown or tan, mottled with black, and the bee-like adult males have clear wings and fur-covered bodies. The females remain larva-like and do not emerge from the bag. The larva may stick its head and front legs out of the top of the bag to feed and move.

Pages