Recent Updates

  1. Low-Cost Crop-Management Considerations

    In order to optimize production, it is necessary to critically evaluate all agronomic inputs for crop production. The low-cost crop-management considerations explained here are important to economic success in producing agronomic crops.
  2. Involving Parents in 4-H

    The family-oriented 4-H Youth Development program encourages positive relationships among volunteers, members, and parents. Volunteers provide opportunities for members in their club, members utilize the opportunities to develop life skills, and parents provide resources and encouragement for their child.
  3. Estimated Return-to-Seed of Variable vs. Uniform Corn Seeding Rates

    Finding the best corn seeding rate is important for efficient production. The “optimum” corn seeding rate—the one that maximizes profitability—can vary within and among fields with small differences in soils and weather. Given the advances in agronomic production and breeding, it is important to know how practices such as variable rate seeding with modern hybrids may affect profitability.
  4. Hydroponic Nutrient Solution for Optimized Greenhouse Tomato Production

    Utilizing an appropriate nutrient solution is one of the most important components of establishing and maintaining a hydroponic greenhouse tomato crop. In hydroponic production, all of the essential nutrients (Table 1) must be provided to the plant in solution form as the substrates typically used for tomato production have no nutritional component as would soil in field production. This fact sheet will provide a guideline to formulate nutrient solutions for successful hydroponic tomato production under a controlled environment.
  5. The Basics of a Farm Balance Sheet

    The farm balance sheet is one of three financial statements that provide critical information about a farm business. Completing an annual balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows is critical to helping farm businesses understand their financial health. The balance sheet provides a picture of your farm’s financial position on a specified date. The picture is painted by describing all of the assets owned by the business and listing all of the liabilities or financial obligations to others. The balance sheet is also known as the net worth statement.
  6. Fundamentals of energy analysis for crop production agriculture

    Energy is embodied in all of the equipment, inputs, and products of agriculture. Agriculture both uses and supplies energy in the form of bioenergy and food. The amount of energy used in agriculture has grown substantially, and currently, the agri-food chain accounts for 30 percent of the total energy used around the world [1]. Sustainable agricultural production requires the optimization of land use, energy efficiency, end of the use of fossil energy sources, and minimization of environmental impacts. Current agricultural systems are heavily dependent on fossil energy resources.
  7. Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2017-18

    Ohio cropland values and cash rental rates are projected to decrease in 2018. According to the Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, bare cropland values in western Ohio are expected to decrease from 1.7 to 3.6 percent in 2018 depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to decline from 1.2 percent to 3.0 percent depending on the region and land class.
  8. Beech Bark Disease

    Beech bark disease (BBD) is a devastating disease of American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrl.) caused by a combination of damage to the bark and vascular tissue by the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga), followed by infection with several fungal species (Neonectria faginata, Neonectria ditissima, and Bionectria ochroleuca). Beech scale was introduced into Nova Scotia from Europe in the 1890s and has been slowly progressing through the range of American beech since then (Figure 1).
  9. Selecting Hydrangeas for the Home Landscape

    Hydrangeas are relatively easy to grow with a variety of flower colors and sizes. The popularity of hydrangeas has grown tremendously during recent years. As a group, they can bloom from May through fall and have features that garner interest into early winter. Their name, hydrangea, comes from the Greek words “hydor” meaning water, referring to the plant’s preference for moisture, and “aggeion” meaning vessel, referring to the shape of the seed capsule (Oregon State University, 2015). Below are pictures of common hydrangeas grown in Ohio.
  10. Growing Onions in the Garden

    Onions are adaptable with long- and intermediate-day onions growing well in Ohio. Photo by Tim Malinich, OSU Extension.

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