Ohio State University Extension Bulletin

Agronomic Crops Team On-Farm Research Projects 1999

Special Circular 176-00


Ashtabula County Short-Season Corn Variety Test Plots

David L. Marrison*, Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent
Phil Rzewnicki, On-Farm Research Coordinator

Objective: To provide a source of objective information on the relative performance of short-season corn hybrids currently available to Ashtabula County farmers

Background


Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Keith Palmer
Andover
Platea silt loam
  Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Brian Forman
Geneva
Sheffield silt loam
Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Wheat
April 28, 1999
October 18, 1999
139.2 bu/acre
15.2%
  Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Legume Hay
April 30, 1999
October 20, 1999
161.8 bu/acre
17.1%
Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Rick Humphries
Orwell
Sheffield silt loam
  Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Lester Marrison
Jefferson
Sheffield silt loam
Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Soybeans
May 3, 1999
September 27, 1999
142.8 bu/acre
18.44%
  Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Grass/Legume Hay
May 11, 1999
Nov. 5, 1999
138.0 bu/acre
16.7%
Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Bill Hurst
Dorset
Sheffield silt loam
  Cooperator:
Nearest Town:
Major Soil Type:
Stan Ruck
Geneva
Platea silt loam
Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Soybeans
May 18, 1999
Nov. 10, 1999
152.6 bu/acre
16.2%
  Previous Crop:
Planting Date:
Harvest Date:
Plot Yield (avg):
Grain Moisture:
Grass/Legume Hay
May 18, 1999
Nov. 11, 1999
145 bu/acre
17.1%

Methods

This research project was designed to study the performance of short-season corn hybrids using six farms within the county as replicates. Hybrids submitted for evaluation were 80- to 90-day hybrids with total growing degree days (gdds) required to reach physiological maturity to be less than 2,400 gdds. The specific characteristics that were analyzed were yield, grain moisture at harvest, test weight, and gross return per bushel after corrections were made for drying costs and low test weights.

Hybrids were randomly planted in field-length strips at each of the four farm locations.

Results

Hybrid Performance Across Farm Locations
 
Hybrid/(Maturity)   Yield (bu/ac)
@15.5% moisture
  Population
plants/ac
  Test
Weight
lb/bu
  Moisture
%
  Gross
Return
$/ac

Pioneer 37M34 (99)   177.9 a   27,300   58   17.9   383.91
Pioneer 38P05 (94)   175.7 a   28,000   58   17.1   381.01
Novartis 3030Bt (95)   169.6 ab   27,333   58   17.0   366.77
Novartis 21V6 (87)   157.2 bc   27,000   58   16.1   343.42
Croplan D5862 (87)   148.8 cd   25,583   58   17.8   320.20
Pioneer 3893 (89)   147.1 cd   26,250   58   16.8   319.70
Pioneer 38R21 (92)   145.7 cd   25,700   58   16.7   316.93
Novartis 2555Bt (90)   141.2 de   26,000   58   16.2   308.23
Novartis 24-B9 (90)   131.7 ef   26,000   59   16.6   286.55
Croplan 216 (85)   122.3 f   25,583   56   15.7   267.88
Croplan 154 (77)   94.4 g   24,000   60   16.2   206.04
 
Average   146.0   26,242   58   16.7   317.23
Yields followed by same letter are not significantly different at P = 0.05 Analysis of variance F = 6.57 - yields very significantly different at P = 0.01 - lsd (0.05) = 12.4 CV (yields) = 7.15% Indicates good control of experimental error and relative performance of hybrids not affected by farm location.

Populations were not significantly different among hybrids at P = 0.01 CV (populations) = 5.9%. Indicates good control of experimental error and the population counts on each farm were consistent across hybrids.

Gross Return equals: $2.20 per bushel less discounts of 2 cents per point of moisture over 15.5% and 1 (53lb), 3 (52lb) cents for test weight under 54 lbs.

Summary and Notes

Ten of the 11 corn hybrids in this year's trials yielded higher than the 10-year county average of 104.47 bushels per acre and the five-year average of 114.38 bushels per acre. The top three performing hybrids for 1999 were not significantly different from each other and performed significantly better than the lowest yielding seven hybrids.

Ashtabula County farms encounter fewer growing degree days than most of the remainder of Ohio. The use of 80- to 90-day corn hybrids potentially increases gross returns by reducing the cost of drying longer-season corns. Additionally, the shorter-season corn varieties usually can be harvested earlier in the fall when weather conditions are more favorable.

*For additional information, contact: Ohio State University Extension, Ashtabula County, 39 Wall Street, Jefferson, OH 44047, 440-576-9008, marrison.2@osu.edu


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